Europe

You are here

Global Research Workshops on Freelancing and Self-Employment 2015 Presentations

Various
November, 2015
This document is a collection of the presentations provided at the Global Research Workshops on Freelancing and Self-Employment 2015, held 26-27 November 2015 in London.

Introduction: A Freelancing and Self-Employment Research Agenda

November, 2015
This introduction chapter to The Handbook of Research on Freelancing and Self-Employment provides an overview of the content of the book and outlines a research agenda on freelancing.

Capturing Statistically the “Intermediate Zone” Between the Employee and Employer Firm Owner

November, 2015
This paper provides an overview of the most relevant public data sources for the number of solo self-employed, and discusses the pros and cons of each data source regarding the available data on solo self-employment and its various segments (e.g. freelancers, hybrid entrepreneurs, dependent entrepreneurs). This is chapter 3 of the Handbook of Research on Freelancing and Self-Employment.

Women’s Self-Employment and Freelancers Observations on Female Entrepreneurship

Andrea Klinglmair
November, 2015
This paper focuses on the features of female entrepreneurship. Based on a brief review of the existing literature we identify some major lines of argumentation which treat female self-employment in context with its determinants. This is chapter 5 of the Handbook of Research on Freelancing and Self-Employment.

Determinants of the Own-Account Worker’s Decision to Hire Employees: A Review

Concepción Román
November, 2015
This paper reviews a small stream of empirical literature on job creation by own-account workers which, by using the European Community Household Panel (ECHP), focuses on the determinants of the own-account worker’s decision to hire employees. This is chapter 13 of the Handbook of Research on Freelancing and Self-Employment.

Future Working: The Rise of Europe’s Independent Professionals

November, 2013
The report explores who independent professionals (iPros) are and the environments in which they work, why they choose to work independently and what factors encourage and hinder their success. This ground breaking report provides us for the first time, a deeper understanding of what motivates and drives iPros and the barriers they face. Finally it makes a series of key recommendations that would benefit not just the 9 million iPros that operate in Europe but also the EU economy as a whole.

Pages